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KIDS WON’T ‘SQUASH’ THIS MEAL


Tommy C. Simmons, An enthusiastic cook
Photo Tommy C. Simmons


If you have trouble getting kids (or grandkids) to eat squash, this recipe for Steamed Yellow Squash will change their minds. It even has the endorsement of another squash doubter, country music star Trisha Yearwood. Yearwood claims in her cookbook, “Georgia Cooking in an Oklahoma Kitchen,” that she doesn’t like squash but thinks this is a “yummy” dish.
Pick smaller sized crookneck squash for steaming. The smaller squash are generally tender and cook faster than larger squash. I’ve prepared the dish with zucchini, also. Both work equally well.

I did not plant squash or zucchini this year, but have found a good selection of small squash at both the supermarket and local farmers’ market. On one recent rainy evening, we dined on nothing more than a bowl filled with steamed yellow squash. I agree with Yearwood this is a “yummy” dish.

Home kitchen-tested recipe
Steamed Yellow Squash
Serves 6. Recipe is from “Georgia Cooking in an Oklahoma Kitchen” by Trisha Yearwood with Gwen Yearwood and Beth Yearwood Bernard.
“Cook out as much liquid as you can by uncovering and stirring often. A little browning doesn’t hurt.”

4 tbls. butter
1 small sweet onion, such as a Vidalia, peeled and finely chopped
12 medium yellow crookneck squash, trimmed and sliced ¼-inch thick
½ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. pepper

  1. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the onion in the butter until it browns slightly, about 5 minutes.
  2. Layer the squash slices into the skillet and sprinkle with the salt and pepper.
  3. Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low, and cook the squash for 20 minutes, or until tender.
  4. Remove the cover. Stir the squash and continue cooking until the liquid has cooked out, another 3 or 4 minutes.

Posted September 13, 2013


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