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Show #34/4908. Desert Plants Are Tough, But Adaptable

How to Make a Succulent Wreath

JOE TELLS CHAD THAT GARDEN SMART VIEWERS ARE PRETTY SAVVY GARDENERS, they love learning about different plants and seeing beautiful gardens but they also enjoy the information in each show that can be applied to their own homes and gardens. To this end Chad has created a beautiful wreath filled with plant material that was obtained either here at the gift shop or at the local craft store. Chad proceeds to tell us how to make this wreath. (More information can be found by clicking on the link at the bottom of the page.) First choose about 60-75 plants, cuttings would be best. Chad has chosen small Crassula, Gasteria and Harworthia to make up the bulk of the wreath plant material. These are in the Aloe family or related to Aloes. Chad obtained a form from the craft store, you could make one. He also purchased moss and wire at the craft store. He then pressed the moss on the form, wrapping it in place. Do the same to the top part of the form. Really pack it in, so it holds all together. In the trench he put the potting soil. Chad used a succulent mix, a good sandy, well draining medium works best for most of the succulent plants. Put the 2 sides of the form together, mash it up tight, tie it. Next decide where you want the wreath to be. If something that hangs up, it will be planted differently than if it is going to sit down with a candle in the middle. Chad's will be laying flat. But if hanging up one would accent the bottom part. Remember to plant on either side of the central wire. A dribble is used to create holes. He puts a little Gasteria in the hole, making sure to get the roots in. This is why cuttings work best, they're easier to stick in. A little chopstick is used to help inch it in place and into the potting soil. If it becomes a problem getting the plant to stay it could be initially wired in with floral wire. Be careful not to overplant, remember these plants will be growing and will look their best in about 2 months. Joe thinks this is a great project, one he will try and feels it is one everyone across the country could complete and enjoy.


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By Karen Weir-Jimerson, Costa Farms, Photographs courtesy of Costa Farms

A Norfolk Island pine looks like a Christmas tree in miniature, so many people use these floor and tabletop plants as holiday trees. An interesting article, click here to read.


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