GardenSmart :: EPISODES :: 2009 show3
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Show #3/1503
Maui Garden Tour


Entrance To The First House
In looking over THE ENTRANCE TO THE FIRST HOUSE Richard comments that many times a house of this size and a garden of this size has a grand overpowering entrance. But, this one is simple. And, that was by design. Hunton likes gardens to unfold, he likes to build mystery. The surprises come later. But he wants it to be interesting at the same time, he wants it to be unfolding and revealing as time goes on, or as the stroll through the garden goes on. Richard sees that here, he can't even see the house from the entrance. Again, that was by design. Hunton wanted the house to be revealed at the end of the drive, as opposed to seeing it as one drives up.

Click here for more info

Pool Area
THE FIRST AREA IS THE POOL AREA. Richard thinks this is the best looking Infinity pool he's seen. Hunton wanted the pool to feel like it was part of the garden, thus used minimum paving around the pool, then exaggerated the plants that are around the swimming pool to make them more a feature of the garden rather than the patio furniture around it.

Click here for more info

The Shade Garden
The guys next visit THE SHADE GARDEN. They came across the open space of the rolling lawn and are now within an island within the estate. Richard notices that they've gone from a very manicured, cared-for area to a woodsy space. Again, that was Hunton's design concept. He tried to make this area feel like it was a place in nature, one that was left here, then the garden was built around it. The natural feel was intended. Yet Richard still feels a sense of inter-connection between this space and some of the other spaces. Hunton has accomplished that by utilizing Festuca rubra Red creeping Fescue. The ground cover here ties into the ground cover that brings the whole garden together.

Click here for more info

Blue Pocket Garden
Next visited is THE BLUE POCKET GARDEN. A glimpse of this garden was seen when up at the house but up close the scale and size is apparent. Agave Americana Blue Agave Century Plant is impressive, both the color and scale, thus draws ones eye, inviting one to this corner of the garden. It almost forces one to take the long stroll through the garden and along the way discover other things in the garden. This is the signal post at the end that draws ones eye. It is a great use of form and texture.

Click here for more info

The Japanese Garden
THE JAPANESE GARDEN IS A VERY SIMPLE SPACE. It's not intended to be an elaborate Japanese garden. Many will get carried away with ornamentation when designing a Japanese garden, this is intended to be extremely simple. It has stone lanterns leading into the garden, it has a Buddha, then a granite bowl with a bamboo spout with water trickling into it to provide a sound of water and add that contemplative feel. The rustle of bamboo also adds to that contemplation.

Click here for more info

The Second Home and Garden
THE SECOND PLACE IS VERY DIFFERENT AND VERY DIFFERENT IN SIZE. The 1st was 5 acres, this is 1/2 acre. The first was up country, this has an ocean view. This is on a cul-de-sac but Richard, upon arriving, almost didn't realize it was a residence. Again, Hunton tried to do something that was understated, yet at the same time, let one know they've arrived, but not overdo it. The entrance has a bit of formality with its symmetry but at the same time, it's not overdone. That, again, is Hunton's style. Try to let the secrets unfold themselves as opposed to presenting it all in front.

Click here for more info

Screening Plant Material
THE CHOICE OF PLANT MATERIAL IS EFFECTIVE IN CREATING THE SCREEN. The Samanea saman Monkeypod trees are quite tall, but rather than block out the entire borrowed view of the trees on the other properties Hunton put in a hedge of Polyscias fruiticosa Ming Arelia which grow to about 6 feet. These are 13 years old and have been this size for some time. These hedges allow them to bring in light and a sense of space but at the same time not close it up. Richard feels many homeowners that have small properties want a screen plant that can grow to 30-50 feet tall and when it does they feel like they're in a closet. Hunton here wanted to allow air to pass through the property and not to have that sense of enclosure. He has also used Heliconia Dwarf Heliconia 'Parakeet' which is a true tropical.

Click here for more info

The Orchard
The lower garden is also striking, it's beautiful but productive as well. THIS IS AN ORCHARD. But, it isn't laid out like an orchard. The intention was to have the owner be able to stroll through the garden on a daily basis and watch as the fruit ripens, as opposed to knowing the day the fruit is ripe, then coming in with a formal harvester and harvesting. This is a garden and it's an orchard, it's a personal place, not commercial thus there is no reason to put fruit-bearing trees in straight rows unless you're harvesting with a tractor.

Click here for more info

Architecture Of The Home
Hunton was involved in the garden design but was ALSO INVOLVED WITH THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE BUILDING. He created all the different spaces. Specifically, a back/inside area which is very cozy and intimate, a sunny/open area, still covered but as we move into the outdoor space an area with dappled shade, it's a half-sun/half-shade area that is perfect for a lot of activities, but once at the pool an open/full-sun area.

Many of the plants in this show may not do well in your garden but if looking for colorful new plant ideas click on the link below.

GardenSmart :: PLANT OF THE WEEK

Click here for more info

Hale
THIS IS A SECRET PART OF THE GARDEN. The guys are sitting underneath the traditional Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. cv., Hawaiian hale (pronounced holly). Hale is a word that means house in Hawaiian. This building was built to emulate traditional Hawaiian architecture. The pebbles that are on the floor are exactly what the Hawaiians would have had on the floor of their homes in earlier times, the thatch on the roof and the way the structure is made of Ohia lehual Ohia post is all very traditionally done.

Click here for more info

 

LINKS:

Wailea Beach Marriott Resort & Spa

Maui Visitors Bureau

Hunton Conrad

Garden Smart Plant List

Video Tips:
Designs That Reveal slowly
Sense of privacy
Two Great Gardens

Blooper #1
Blooper #2


Complete transcript of the show.

Show 3/1503. Maui Garden Tour
When people think of Maui they think resorts, and, it's no wonder. Maui has been voted Best Island Resort for 16 consecutive years. But, there's a lot more to Maui than their resorts. Maui has a population of approximately 120,000 with approximately 60,000 housing units. And like all cities, it has a mayor. GardenSMART is honored to have the Mayor Of Maui, Charmaine Tavares, join the show.

The Mayor feels when people come to an area they want to learn more about that place. Maui offers natural beauty, resources and importantly great people. The people are what set Maui apart from other places. There is a lot of cultural diversity in Maui. When the plantations were starting in Hawaii, particularly in Maui, they brought in, what were known as contract laborers, from countries like the Philippines, Japan, Portugal and China. These foreign people were arriving in waves to work on the plantations. Those people built the communities that we know today. They brought with them all parts of their culture. Food is an example, art, music cultural traditions, all were brought in and they are all celebrated today. Throughout most of the year they have festivals celebrating those traditions. The Mayor feels folks here learn to work side by side toward a common goal. She feels here they have set an example for the world to see how various cultures can get together, get along and work towards that common goal. In fact some have referred to Maui as a living museum. That's because each of the cultures has maintained their uniqueness and they celebrate their uniqueness and share their cultures with others through the festivals happening year round. One will notice the clothing, the costumes, the food, the music, everything. Thus it really is a living museum. Every person, in every event is part of this living museum. And, it's exciting.

This Island was formed by 2 volcanoes and through erosion of the central plain. That is why Maui is called the Valley Isle because of the huge valley in the middle. The temperature ranges between the valley and the mountains is substantial. Thus when people build their homes they build according to their resources and what they want to capture in their environment. The variety of architecture between the mountains and the ocean is dramatic. The Mayor knows we're going to see some neat homes today and wishes us well on the adventure.

Richard opines that there are many beautiful homes in Maui but rarely does one get to go behind the gate to see what's going on. Well that's not the case in this show. Hunton Conrad joins us on GardenSMART. Hunton is a landscape designer and shows us several beautiful homes on the Island.

Hunton as a child was interested in plants. He grew up here, liked playing with plants, would go out and harvest them in nature, then bring them in and arrange them in his parents' gardens. After a time he started doing landscape design and architectural design and that led him to design beautiful gardens. Hunton believes that blocking a garden is as important as the walls in architecture. How you shape a garden is really the plants you use and how you stack them up near each other and away from each other. The framing of a garden is more important to Hunton than the species that are planted within the garden, even more than the color in a garden. Color, to Hunton, is more of an accent, like the jimmies on an ice cream.

In looking over THE ENTRANCE TO THE FIRST HOUSE Richard comments that many times a house of this size and a garden of this size has a grand overpowering entrance. But, this one is simple. And, that was by design. Hunton likes gardens to unfold, he likes to build mystery. The surprises come later. But he wants it to be interesting at the same time, he wants it to be unfolding and revealing as time goes on, or as the stroll through the garden goes on. Richard sees that here, he can't even see the house from the entrance. Again, that was by design. Hunton wanted the house to be revealed at the end of the drive, as opposed to seeing it as one drives up. It was purposeful in this garden. And, it creates a sense of anticipation. As the guys entered from the street Richard noticed the entrance which was cozy, it was intimate but as he enters the view is incredible. In Maui they're fortunate to have spectacular views from the slopes of Haleakala. As one is looking down at the coast one sees, what is called, the Isthmus and then the West Maui Mountains, then Lana'i and other Islands such as Molokai. This all makes a stunningly beautiful backdrop for an exciting garden.

Hunton and Richard start looking at the gardens. This is a large garden, it's 5 acres at an elevation of 2,800 feet on the slopes of Haleakala. So, in order to make the garden interesting and unfold Hunton creates pocket gardens, little gardens within the larger frame of the large garden.
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THE FIRST AREA IS THE POOL AREA. Richard thinks this is the best looking Infinity pool he's seen. Hunton wanted the pool to feel like it was part of the garden, thus used minimum paving around the pool, then exaggerated the plants that are around the swimming pool to make them more a feature of the garden rather than the patio furniture around it. Hunton used a lot of interesting design techniques, such as incorporating plants that brought the copper roof down into the garden. Thus the Pennisetum 'Rubrum' Red Fountain Grass is incorporated. Then sweeping around are the Bromeliads, a cousin to the pineapple. The pool looks like it's overflowing into the Protea garden, which really makes the flowers pop. The area is intended to feel like a separate garden or a separate room near the house. And it works.
Top

The guys next visit THE SHADE GARDEN. They came across the open space of the rolling lawn and are now within an island within the estate. Richard notices that they've gone from a very manicured, cared-for area to a woodsy space. Again, that was Hunton's design concept. He tried to make this area feel like it was a place in nature, one that was left here, then the garden was built around it. The natural feel was intended. Yet Richard still feels a sense of inter-connection between this space and some of the other spaces. Hunton has accomplished that by utilizing Festuca rubra Red creeping Fescue. The ground cover here ties into the ground cover that brings the whole garden together. He's used it throughout the entire garden as a frame, so that when one goes from 1 space, or pocket garden, to another one doesn't feel they're completely stepping from a pink room to a blue room, for example. There is a thread that connects, a sense of informality is the way Richard sees it. One doesn't feel they've been jolted into a new environment, instead eased into a new one. The plants work well and one primary reason is they've chosen plants that grow well in the shade. There is a light canopy of Schinus molle California Pepper Tree. The Red Fescue provides almost a background effect, it has a nice rippling effect, almost like water. When the wind blows, it feels restful. They have blocked the bushes into groups as opposed to spreading them out evenly throughout the space. The Bambusa bamboo is an example. This creates what Hunton calls "negative space." It does 2 things - it leads ones eye from one pocket garden into another and it also allows the bushes and the plants that are within the shade garden to actually pop and be more dramatic by the contrast of the negative space. Richard feels the fine textures and the cool colors really are relaxing.
Top

Next visited is THE BLUE POCKET GARDEN. A glimpse of this garden was seen when up at the house but up close the scale and size is apparent. Agave Americana Blue Agave Century Plant is impressive, both the color and scale, thus draws ones eye, inviting one to this corner of the garden. It almost forces one to take the long stroll through the garden and along the way discover other things in the garden. This is the signal post at the end that draws ones eye. It is a great use of form and texture.
Top

THE JAPANESE GARDEN IS A VERY SIMPLE SPACE. It's not intended to be an elaborate Japanese garden. Many will get carried away with ornamentation when designing a Japanese garden, this is intended to be extremely simple. It has stone lanterns leading into the garden, it has a Buddha, then a granite bowl with a bamboo spout with water trickling into it to provide a sound of water and add that contemplative feel. The rustle of bamboo also adds to that contemplation. This garden is close to the house because the owner wanted something close to the house to be able to go to while taking breaks from his high stress job. Although it's enclosed, it's within a very large open area. It was intended to close you off visually and make it feel almost like a separate room, but at the same time with a peek-a-boo through the stalks of the Bambusa (Bamboo) Blow-pipe it allows one to get a glimpse of the skyline and view what's going on outside, so when ready to leave the garden, it actually invites you out. It's a wonderful, introverted space in a very extroverted area.
Top

Richard has really enjoyed the first garden and can't wait to see the second. THE SECOND PLACE IS VERY DIFFERENT AND VERY DIFFERENT IN SIZE. The 1st was 5 acres, this is 1/2 acre. The first was up country, this has an ocean view. This is on a cul-de-sac but Richard, upon arriving, almost didn't realize it was a residence. Again, Hunton tried to do something that was understated, yet at the same time, let one know they've arrived, but not overdo it. The entrance has a bit of formality with its symmetry but at the same time, it's not overdone. That, again, is Hunton's style. Try to let the secrets unfold themselves as opposed to presenting it all in front. This lot is very private yet it's in the middle of a subdivision. Richard feels he's here all by himself. Hunton explains, they were fortunate to block out the street, then use the property as a big open space, thus it provides a sense of privacy. Especially with the swimming pool it feels very open and out in the air, certainly with a swimming pool one wants to be in the sun.
Top

THE CHOICE OF PLANT MATERIAL IS EFFECTIVE IN CREATING THE SCREEN. The Samanea saman Monkeypod trees are quite tall, but rather than block out the entire borrowed view of the trees on the other properties Hunton put in a hedge of Polyscias fruiticosa Ming Arelia which grow to about 6 feet. These are 13 years old and have been this size for some time. These hedges allow them to bring in light and a sense of space but at the same time not close it up. Richard feels many homeowners that have small properties want a screen plant that can grow to 30-50 feet tall and when it does they feel like they're in a closet. Hunton here wanted to allow air to pass through the property and not to have that sense of enclosure. He has also used Heliconia Dwarf Heliconia 'Parakeet' which is a true tropical. This variety is called Parakeet. There are Bougainvillea surrounding the property, one large clump utilizes Bougainvillea Bougainvillea 'Ms Manila.' It's a beautiful orange-golden pink color, thus has 3 different colors in one flower. It's a popular variety in Hawaii. It's a shrub and flowers year-round, thus doesn't need replanted. This one has been here for 13 years and will hopefully be here another 13 years.

The blue flowers are Evolvulus glomeratus Blue Daze. It is a perennial ground cover. The term perennial can be confusing because it means it lives more than 2 years but it could be a short-lived perennial as well. In Hawaii it lasts about 3 years.

Cocos nucifera Coconut Palm is very Hawaii, especially at the lower elevations. Its coconuts are a symbol of paradise and the Palm adds a strong vertical element to set off the rest of the plants.
Top

The lower garden is also striking, it's beautiful but productive as well. THIS IS AN ORCHARD. But, it isn't laid out like an orchard. The intention was to have the owner be able to stroll through the garden on a daily basis and watch as the fruit ripens, as opposed to knowing the day the fruit is ripe, then coming in with a formal harvester and harvesting. This is a garden and it's an orchard, it's a personal place, not commercial thus there is no reason to put fruit-bearing trees in straight rows unless you're harvesting with a tractor. Richard is a big fan of sustainable landscaping. Every plant in a garden needs to have a function, have a purpose. It can be beautiful, as well, but that's the key ingredient to a sustainable garden.

The fruit trees look very healthy. The Mangifera indica Haden Mango, Mango tree, blew down last winter in a storm. It was such a good bearer they decided to try to save it. This spring was its best season ever, thus are very happy they saved it. It is kind of laying on its side, looks propped up but bears great fruit. Sometimes a little stress on a plant will cause it to bear more fruit.

There is a clump of Papayas, Carica Papayas. There are 2 babies, immature plants. They always keep them staging because Papayas only last a few years. This is a good example of a productive plant that at this stage of its life is not always great looking. That's one of the reasons it's in the lower garden with the rest of the fruit. It's not great looking but always good eating.



An interesting fruit is the Averrhoa carambola Starfruit. It is an unusual fruit, a favorite of local people, very delicious, sweet but tangy at the same time. It is called Starfruit because it has 6 points and when sliced and put on a plate it looks like a star.

They have 5 different varieties of citrus. One is, Citrus reticulata var Tangerine which produces fruit in the wintertime and is filled with fruit right now. They have different kinds of citrus that ripen at different times of the year. It's a smart idea to have a productive garden that produces something every season.

They have some plants that don't produce edible fruit but do offer other things for the family. For example Plumeria obtusa Plumeria trees. Plumeria is the traditional lei-making flower in Hawaii. One normally receives a lei when arriving. A lei is a flower garland, these garlands can be made right here in the garden, then taken to the airport and given to friends. A great touch.
Top

Hunton was involved in the garden design but was ALSO INVOLVED WITH THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE BUILDING. He created all the different spaces. Specifically, a back/inside area which is very cozy and intimate, a sunny/open area, still covered but as we move into the outdoor space an area with dappled shade, it's a half-sun/half-shade area that is perfect for a lot of activities, but once at the pool an open/full-sun area. These areas were intended to give the owner several different choices of places to hang out at different times of the day because it gets sunny, then shady, there could be a squall that could blow through yet one wants to be able to enjoy that indoor/outdoor atmosphere, to be able to sit in an environment that keeps you comfortable throughout the day. Especially in Hawaii one could almost be outside 365 days a year. This is a concept that should work for many of our viewers. There are times of the year when one wants to bring a little of the outdoors in and a little of the indoors out. A space like this allows you to do just that. This concept would work well in many different parts of the country to extend the part of the year that one can enjoy this kind of experience. You may not be completely outside but at the same time you have the ability to feel you're partially outside.
Top

The next area although part of the garden is a very different place. THIS IS A SECRET PART OF THE GARDEN. The guys are sitting underneath the traditional Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. cv., Hawaiian hale (pronounced holly). Hale is a word that means house in Hawaiian. This building was built to emulate traditional Hawaiian architecture. The pebbles that are on the floor are exactly what the Hawaiians would have had on the floor of their homes in earlier times, the thatch on the roof and the way the structure is made of Ohia lehual Ohia post is all very traditionally done. Richard likes a garden that has a destination and one that also has some historical value. To Hunton, they're in Hawaii, try to emulate their past. Even though one can't or wouldn't live in a piece of architecture like this, bring in something like this to remind ourselves of our environment and the history of the area. Anybody in any part of the country could use this same concept with a small building on their property. For example, if from the South one might have a small cabin reminiscent of earlier times in a corner of their backyard. It doesn't necessarily need to be seen from the house but then when arriving at the cabin it has a romantic notion, it provides a sense of place and a sense of time. It can be a great addition and very different.

Hunton impresses Richard as a man with a number of skills and abilities. What thoughts would he like to leave with the audience? Hunton believes strongly that homes and gardens should not face the street, they should keep the focus within. Your life is lived privately in a home, you're there to share your time with your family and enjoy your home life. So, why direct a lot of energy towards the street. Also, create a sense of mystery at the entry, but then use your energy inside the environment. It creates a sense of privacy and a sense of being at home. Don't spend all your money and all your resources trying to impress people on the road. Turn it inward.

This has been a great learning experience. Thank you Hunton for the tour and the great gardens and garden design ideas. This has been a wonderful experience.
Top

LINKS:

Wailea Beach Marriott Resort & Spa

Maui Visitors Bureau

Hunton Conrad

Garden Smart Plant List

Video Tips:
Designs That Reveal slowly
Sense of privacy
Two Great Gardens

Blooper #1
Blooper #2

 
FEATURED ARTICLE
GardenSMART Featured Article

By Lisa Bartlett, Smith Gilbert Gardens

Spring ephemerals are some of the first plants to flower in the early spring long before most trees leaf out. They tend not to like the heat and will quickly disappear if temperatures get above 80 degrees. Spring ephemerals leaf out, bloom, go to seed, spread themselves about and then enter dormancy; they don't really die. All this happens in a two-month period, making them some of the most efficient of the flowering plants. That is what makes these plants so very special. Read more...


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