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Show #50/7011. Plan For Seasons Of Color In Our Garden

Summary of Show

Extending The Season

Natalie has put together a great collection of plants to consider for EXTENDING THE SEASON in any garden. In this episode we're talking about the year in the garden and how to extend seasons beyond the traditional hotspots in the garden. When looking at spring into early summer there are a ton of things that are in bloom and of course the garden centers do a wonderful job of showing us all of that.
For More Information Click here

Companion Planting

And a great lead in to what's not only going to look great in the spring, but what's going to look great through the season, into the fall. There are things that look wonderful at different times of the year so it's a process of taking notes and observing at what different points of the year are there holes in our garden? What do I need to think about plugging in? Or does October look particularly tired in my garden? Well, there are solutions for that. Natalie agrees, she likes to call that COMPANION PLANTING.
For More Information Click here

Availability Of New Plants

Eric loves the AVAILABILITY OF NEW PLANTS, just the way that horticulture is expanding to fill all of these needs. And of course, plant breeders are working super hard to come up with plants that bloom multiple times in the season. Think of azaleas, the old school azaleas would get that one magical bloom that for Eric in Georgia is June-ish and then they would be finished. So one could have an attractive shrub for a period of time but beyond that, wouldn't get multiple additional seasons of bloom. The way they have developed new plants has helped really expand the season.
For More Information Click here

Containers

Eric agrees, he has been thinking about new plants a lot and has started incorporating many into his garden the last few years. His garden is a very small garden, it's super compact. So he's loving all these dwarf plants that are coming out. They're perfect for him. But, as well, he has started incorporating a lot of CONTAINERS into his design. Not only do containers provide bright, bold colors that basically become a piece of sculpture, but as well a nice focal point in the garden, adding that splash of color. But then also throughout the season, he is able to change it out with fun annuals. He uses a lot of flowering woody ornamentals. He finds that just the versatility of containers really adds a lot to the garden.
For More Information Click here

Foliage

Eric knows that many gardeners are thinking of FOLIAGE too. Beyond the bloom, what are we getting from that plant from a foliage standpoint? And there are so many different directions that one can go when thinking about what is that plant going to look like throughout the seasons. One container has a beautiful spirea in front. Eric loves this plant. It starts off bright chartreuse but then you get all of these different aspects of that plant that you get to enjoy that extend well beyond what's happening with the bloom.
For More Information Click here

Azaleas

Eric moves on to some wonderful plant selections. Let's start with the AZALEAS. He loves azaleas in the garden. They are another great example of a plant that has gone from what was available 25, 30 years ago, when azaleas were, our grandmother's azaleas, to now a plant that has an incredibly wide range of interest basically spanning two and a half to three seasons. Re-blooming azaleas are now really the benchmark of what people are looking for when it comes to putting an azalea in their garden. Because they're a broad leaf evergreen one gets that nice green deep foliage all season long. But an azalea that's going to bloom in the spring and then bloom again in the fall. Wow!
For More Information Click here

Spireas

Natalie shows two SPIREAS from the Double Play series of spirea. And what's interesting about these spireas is they're both a sterile variety, which means they don't produce any seed. So it's going to produce a seed head, but it's not going to have any seed in it. So in the instance of the Double Play Doozie Spirea, it's going to bloom these beautiful dark red blooms straight through the seed heads. If you've ever grown a plant that flowers only one time, it will bloom and then that bloom is telling the plant, I'm all done for the year. Well, if it doesn't produce any seed, it doesn't know any better and it just keeps blooming and blooming and blooming.
For More Information Click here

Fothergilla

Eric notices that Natalie also has a FOTHERGILLA. This is a offshoot of a plant introduced a few years ago called Legend of the Fall. One thing she loves about fothergilla, is its great fall color. Initially it came out as Legend of the Fall and then came out with a dwarf guy called Legend of the Small. This is a dwarf fothergilla, commonly called a bottle brush.
For More Information Click here

Caryopteris

Eric would next like to talk about CARYOPTERIS. It is one of his favorite perennials of all time. Natalie elaborates - This is called Beyond Midnight, it has dark, dark green, almost blue foliage. And then it has a companion plant that just came out called Beyond Pink'd Caryopteris. So even though it's called a blue beard, it has a pink flower and they're kind of these round flowers that kind of surround each stem, almost looks like a truffle tree out of Dr. Seuss or something like that.
For More Information Click here

Heptacodium

Eric notices a new HEPTACODIUM. This is Temple of Bloom Heptacodium Seven Sunflower and there are a lot of reasons to love Temple of Bloom. It's a tree, or could be a multi stem shrub. It's typically a very large plant, but this one is only going to get to be six to 10 feet tall. So as trees go, that's a pretty compact size. And what Natalie personally loves is that great peeling bark. Almost like a crepe myrtle where you really love that peeling bark, which gives another piece of interest to the garden. This has that very interesting bark underneath the canopy of foliage, with a late summer flower.
For More Information Click here

Hydrangeas

Eric loves HYDRANGEAS. They are the queens of the garden. He has tons of them. And it's definitely a space that is ever evolving with so many new, exciting cultivars coming out every single year. Natalie has some wonderful examples of those that are really great at extending that late summer into early fall season. Talk us through these. Natalie has some beautiful cultivars that are easy to grow, bloom prolifically, provide color in the middle of the season all the way into the end of the season.
For More Information Click here

Hybrid Hydrangea

Eric notices an excellent HYBRID. He loves the blooms. We're getting kind of the best of both worlds on this one. It's a wonderful, almost lavender color, really nice structure to it. Great foliage. Which plant is this? This is called Let's Dance Can Do, it is a mountain hydrangea, big leaf hydrangea hybrid. And the beautiful lace cap bloom will turn blue or like a purply blue depending on the soil or a pink in more alkaline soil. It has great color. And not only does it have the great color of the bloom in season, but also provides great color with the foliage. Speaking of flower color, so many people love that really nice, bright clean blue, which can be difficult to get on hydrangeas. Natalie has an example that's just a beautiful blue.
For More Information Click here

Dwarf Hydrangeas

One innovation with hydrangeas that Eric really, really loves is the move in the direction of really nice DWARF VERSIONS OF HYDRANGEAS. He loves the big ones, but smaller gardens can't always accommodate them. What are some of Natalie's favorites of the new dwarf hydrangeas? Natalie agrees, everybody loves to grow like a limelight hydrangeas, right? But they can grow to be eight, nine feet tall. If you want that great new wood blooming, pinnacle hydrangea, that's got this great white bloom that turns pink in the fall, these dwarf guys are a great answer. Natalie shows us an example of Firelight Tidbit. This is a small dwarf hydrangea. It's only going to get to be two to three feet tall and wide. It's one of the smallest pinnacles on the market right now.
For More Information Click here

Weigelas

Where the WEIGELAS of old are beautiful, but now there's just an amazing array of foliage and bloom qualities, and of course, dwarf, tight compact plants. Tell us where weigela is today. Natalie explains, there are several brand new ones just being introduced. The first is called Vinho Verde, this is a weigela with a black margin at the center of the leaf and has this green kind of a modeled center, then the margin of each leaf is black.
For More Information Click here

Roses

Eric comments we'd be remiss if we didn't talk about ROSES. He thinks any proper garden should have roses. And roses are another great example of a plant that really has made quite a transition from the roses that we knew, the old world roses, to now a whole host of roses that basically fit into almost any slot that one would need in the garden. Of course now we have roses that bloom almost the entire warm season, which is really, really incredible. Natalie comments if people were to grow typically old-fashioned hybrid roses, one would only get one bloom and you're done. They're gorgeous, but they are a lot of work. What we have now are some new roses coming out in the Reminiscent Series of roses. They have that durability of a shrub rose but bring scent back into the garden and present that look of a garden rose, something that you could trim and put into a vase.
For More Information Click here

Waxwings

Eric notices a wonderful plant that he’s actually not that familiar with. It has dynamic foliage that helps extend the season. And these look almost artificial. They're so interesting. These are WAXWINGS. And Natalie has three wonderful selections. Talk to us about this plant a little bit. This plant is called a coprosma or a mirror bush. You probably wouldn't be familiar with it unless you live in a really warm climate.
For More Information Click here

Crepe Myrtle

Eric loves CREPE MYRTLE and it's another example of a plant that has really, really come a long way. Natalie agrees, things like the Center Stage series of crepe myrtle have that deep, dark purple, almost black foliage.
For More Information Click here

Blueberry Plants

Eric wants to talk about BLUEBERRY PLANTS. He loves when things we think of in terms, of more of an agricultural or a food crop, crossover into the ornamental space. Natalie agrees, this plant is Sky Dew Gold Blueberry, a vaccinium.
For More Information Click here

Conifers

Eric prompts Natalie, as we wrap up our conversation about all the amazing options that we have as gardeners to extend the season, we can't leave out the whole gymnosperms category, all the CONIFERS. Natalie has a couple of great examples. This chamaecyparis, is beautiful with its wispy blue foliage. Natalie believes that when a lot of people think evergreen, they think all evergreens are green.
For More Information Click here

LINKS:

Spring Meadow Nursery
Spring Meadow Nursery

Natalie Carmolli
All Your Hydrangea Questions Answered - Proven Winners ColorChoice

Containers
Collections | Michael Carr Designs

Plant List

Show #50/7011. Plan For Seasons Of Color In Our Garden

Transcript of Show

Ever wonder how to plan your garden to give you beautiful dynamic interest all year long. With a little thought and planning we can do just that.

Eric Johnson welcomes Natalie Carmolli to the show. Thank you so much for joining us. Natalie is happy to be here. Natalie is rooted in horticulture having worked in the family floral business until college. In college she earned her degree in theatrical arts. Natalie, now an avid gardener and writer, delights in sharing her expertise and enthusiasm in the art of gardening.

Natalie has put together a great collection of plants to consider for EXTENDING THE SEASON in any garden. In this episode we're talking about the year in the garden and how to extend seasons beyond the traditional hotspots in the garden. When looking at spring into early summer there are a ton of things that are in bloom and of course the garden centers do a wonderful job of showing us all of that. But there are different periods throughout the year where things can be not quite as exciting if we're not thinking about what plants of interest can be introduced into the way we plant and the way that we design our gardens. Natalie agrees, that's a perfect conversation, especially considering it’s now fall.

And a great lead in to what's not only going to look great in the spring, but what's going to look great through the season, into the fall. There are things that look wonderful at different times of the year so it's a process of taking notes and observing at what different points of the year are there holes in our garden? What do I need to think about plugging in? Or does October look particularly tired in my garden? Well, there are solutions for that. Natalie agrees, she likes to call that COMPANION PLANTING. What companions can we put with the things we really love, for example the roses in our garden that are going to look great when the roses are in bloom, but buoy them up when they're not in bloom and provide interest in those spots.

Eric loves the AVAILABILITY OF NEW PLANTS, just the way that horticulture is expanding to fill all of these needs. And of course, plant breeders are working super hard to come up with plants that bloom multiple times in the season. Think of azaleas, the old school azaleas would get that one magical bloom that for Eric in Georgia is June-ish and then they would be finished. So one could have an attractive shrub for a period of time but beyond that, wouldn't get multiple additional seasons of bloom. The way they have developed new plants has helped really expand the season. So looking at plants that are very versatile, plants that provide more than one season of interest is super important. Natalie thinks that’s something people really want, they want things that are going to keep their gardens exciting. So at any skill level, when new plants are developed, plants that are going to keep a garden exciting from spring all the way into fall, even into winter, keeps gardeners engaged and makes the whole process just easier and more fun.

Eric agrees, he has been thinking about new plants a lot and has started incorporating many into his garden the last few years. His garden is a very small garden, it's super compact. So he's loving all these dwarf plants that are coming out. They're perfect for him. But, as well, he has started incorporating a lot of CONTAINERS into his design. Not only do containers provide bright, bold colors that basically become a piece of sculpture, but as well a nice focal point in the garden, adding that splash of color. But then also throughout the season, he is able to change it out with fun annuals. He uses a lot of flowering woody ornamentals. He finds that just the versatility of containers really adds a lot to the garden. Natalie too loves the idea of using really colorful containers. Really making an investment in a good container that is weatherproof, something that one can keep in the garden for the full season is always going to bring that splash of color. And then you can add to that color by changing the plants throughout, whether you choose to put a nice woody ornamental, or a dwarf woody ornamental, in the center and surround it with different kinds of annuals or even perennials. And then in the winter, you can even change it out and put colorful sticks in there, or you can put evergreens into the soil. There are so many things one can do with an interesting and colorful container.

Eric knows that many gardeners are thinking of FOLIAGE too. Beyond the bloom, what are we getting from that plant from a foliage standpoint? And there are so many different directions that one can go when thinking about what is that plant going to look like throughout the seasons. One container has a beautiful spirea in front. Eric loves this plant. It starts off bright chartreuse but then you get all of these different aspects of that plant that you get to enjoy that extend well beyond what's happening with the bloom. Natalie spends a lot of time convincing gardeners to put spirea in their gardens because many feel like spirea is just a landscaping plant. But it's such an interesting foliage plant with the coloration as it changes throughout the season. It's a great example of how foliage can really support a garden with its changing looks.

Eric moves on to some wonderful plant selections. Let's start with the AZALEAS. He loves azaleas in the garden. They are another great example of a plant that has gone from what was available 25, 30 years ago, when azaleas were, our grandmother's azaleas, to now a plant that has an incredibly wide range of interest basically spanning two and a half to three seasons. Re-blooming azaleas are now really the benchmark of what people are looking for when it comes to putting an azalea in their garden. Because they're a broad leaf evergreen one gets that nice green deep foliage all season long. But an azalea that's going to bloom in the spring and then bloom again in the fall. Wow! Plus, they have actually introduced a new line of azaleas that not only do that, but they're a nice, small size as well. Not everybody has room for conventionally sized azaleas. Thus a whole new line has been introduced. They have super bright colors, flowers, nice dense habit and a smaller size to fit a lot of different gardens or even a container. Eric agrees, absolutely, they do wonderfully in containers too. He has one that's been in a container now for seven, eight years. It's mostly ignored and it doesn't seem to mind.

Natalie shows two SPIREAS from the Double Play series of spirea. And what's interesting about these spireas is they're both a sterile variety, which means they don't produce any seed. So it's going to produce a seed head, but it's not going to have any seed in it. So in the instance of the Double Play Doozie Spirea, it's going to bloom these beautiful dark red blooms straight through the seed heads. If you've ever grown a plant that flowers only one time, it will bloom and then that bloom is telling the plant, I'm all done for the year. Well, if it doesn't produce any seed, it doesn't know any better and it just keeps blooming and blooming and blooming. So that's what the Double Play series does and Natalie shows a couple colors. Double Play Doozie, which is one of the best re-bloomers, then Double Play Candy Corn, has candy apple red spring foliage which then turns to a chartreuse green color and then turns to orange in the fall. So when you talk about a spirea plant that's really going to carry a lot of color through just its foliage, Double Play Candy Corn is a great answer to that.

Eric notices that Natalie also has a FOTHERGILLA. This is a offshoot of a plant introduced a few years ago called Legend of the Fall. One thing she loves about fothergilla, is its great fall color. Initially it came out as Legend of the Fall and then came out with a dwarf guy called Legend of the Small. This is a dwarf fothergilla, commonly called a bottle brush. It still has that great spring white bottle brush bloom but additionally a wonderful fall color story on a dwarf frame. It's a very durable plant. One thing Eric has always appreciated about fothergilla is it can take some pretty challenging sites.

Eric would next like to talk about CARYOPTERIS. It is one of his favorite perennials of all time. Natalie elaborates - This is called Beyond Midnight, it has dark, dark green, almost blue foliage. And then it has a companion plant that just came out called Beyond Pink'd Caryopteris. So even though it's called a blue beard, it has a pink flower and they're kind of these round flowers that kind of surround each stem, almost looks like a truffle tree out of Dr. Seuss or something like that. It has a really interesting appearance. They are hardy down to zone seven. So they're great for an Atlanta garden or a garden in this area of Georgia.

Eric notices a new HEPTACODIUM. This is Temple of Bloom Heptacodium Seven Sunflower and there are a lot of reasons to love Temple of Bloom. It's a tree, or could be a multi stem shrub. It's typically a very large plant, but this one is only going to get to be six to 10 feet tall. So as trees go, that's a pretty compact size. And what Natalie personally loves is that great peeling bark. Almost like a crepe myrtle where you really love that peeling bark, which gives another piece of interest to the garden. This has that very interesting bark underneath the canopy of foliage, with a late summer flower. It has a white summer flower followed by a red bract. Once caryopteris is done blooming you get those bright red bracts that are left over. So it has a very late summer, early fall interest in the garden and the pollinators love the flowers. Eric agrees, it's a great example of a plant that really has 3, 4, 5 different levels of interest. And also, he thinks the foliage is very attractive. There's a nice glossy lushness to it, so there's really no way you can go wrong with it.

Eric loves HYDRANGEAS. They are the queens of the garden. He has tons of them. And it's definitely a space that is ever evolving with so many new, exciting cultivars coming out every single year. Natalie has some wonderful examples of those that are really great at extending that late summer into early fall season. Talk us through these. Natalie has some beautiful cultivars that are easy to grow, bloom prolifically, provide color in the middle of the season all the way into the end of the season. Because they are remontant they start blooming on their old wood and then finish on the new wood. So a nice long color story, either with the remontantence of the hybrid hydrangeas, or the big leaf and mountain hydrangeas, or the new wood hydrangeas, like the pinnacle hydrangeas, that bloom mid-summer and then carry that great blush of color story into the fall.

Eric notices an excellent HYBRID. He loves the blooms. We're getting kind of the best of both worlds on this one. It's a wonderful, almost lavender color, really nice structure to it. Great foliage. Which plant is this? This is called Let's Dance Can Do, it is a mountain hydrangea, big leaf hydrangea hybrid. And the beautiful lace cap bloom will turn blue or like a purply blue depending on the soil or a pink in more alkaline soil. It has great color. And not only does it have the great color of the bloom in season, but also provides great color with the foliage. Speaking of flower color, so many people love that really nice, bright clean blue, which can be difficult to get on hydrangeas. Natalie has an example that's just a beautiful blue. Which one is this? This is Let's Dance Skyview. This plant was developed specifically to turn blue easily. A lot of people when they go to the garden center want to get a big leaf hydrangea that's going to turn blue. Not all cultivars are designed to turn blue. But one like this, Let's Dance Skyview, will turn blue and it's going to turn blue faster.

One innovation with hydrangeas that Eric really, really loves is the move in the direction of really nice DWARF VERSIONS OF HYDRANGEAS. He loves the big ones, but smaller gardens can't always accommodate them. What are some of Natalie's favorites of the new dwarf hydrangeas? Natalie agrees, everybody loves to grow like a limelight hydrangeas, right? But they can grow to be eight, nine feet tall. If you want that great new wood blooming, pinnacle hydrangea, that's got this great white bloom that turns pink in the fall, these dwarf guys are a great answer. Natalie shows us an example of Firelight Tidbit. This is a small dwarf hydrangea. It's only going to get to be two to three feet tall and wide. It's one of the smallest pinnacles on the market right now. It was introduced this growing season and has a beautiful pinnacle that's going to turn bluish in the fall. It starts to blush from the bottom up, so you're going to get those nice dark red blooms in the fall. Also, these are also blooms that one can cut, then bring that color into your house. And, even though it's a dwarf, you're going to get a lot of blooms on it. You're going to be able to cut some blooms and bring them inside. Next season they will be introducing Tiny Quickfire. It is an even smaller pinnacle hydrangea. And Eric loves the foliage on it as well. Natalie agrees it has really dark, saturated colored foliage, smaller foliage. The blooms have almost these kind of cup shaped florets. And once again, you're going to get blooming from the top to the bottom. You're going to get all the color you love in a pinnacle hydrangea, mid to late summer color in your garden, but in a very small compact size. You can even put either one of these in a container and they're going to look great. Yes, it's a very, very versatile plant. There's been a tremendous amount of work that's gone into what we see in that genus now.

Where the WEIGELAS of old are beautiful, but now there's just an amazing array of foliage and bloom qualities, and of course, dwarf, tight compact plants. Tell us where weigela is today. Natalie explains, there are several brand new ones just being introduced. The first is called Vinho Verde, this is a weigela with a black margin at the center of the leaf and has this green kind of a modeled center, then the margin of each leaf is black. And, it does have a pink flower in the spring. The reason this was introduced was because it has such interesting foliage. We've never seen a weigela like it. And then a second weigela introduced this year is called Midnight Sun, and it has an orange colored foliage.

Eric comments we'd be remiss if we didn't talk about ROSES. He thinks any proper garden should have roses. And roses are another great example of a plant that really has made quite a transition from the roses that we knew, the old world roses, to now a whole host of roses that basically fit into almost any slot that one would need in the garden. Of course now we have roses that bloom almost the entire warm season, which is really, really incredible. Natalie comments if people were to grow typically old-fashioned hybrid roses, one would only get one bloom and you're done. They're gorgeous, but they are a lot of work. What we have now are some new roses coming out in the Reminiscent Series of roses. They have that durability of a shrub rose but bring scent back into the garden and present that look of a garden rose, something that you could trim and put into a vase. And they bring color back into the garden. The Reminiscent Roses have Reminiscent Crema which has a beautiful white bloom, kind of a buttermilk white bloom. Reminiscent pink has that light old fashioned pink rose. Reminiscent coral has a very rounded coral color bloom. Great for cutting because they smell great. And then the Rise Up Series, which if people want to grow a climber rose, they can train it as a climber or they can prune it down as a shrub. So if you want to bring color up into a trellis above your garden, you can take one of these Rise Up roses, train them on your trellis, and they're going to bloom beautifully for you, plus they're going to be easy to grow like a shrub.

One of the many things that Eric loves about gardening is even if we lived hundreds of years, we would never know all the plants. And there's this endless march of wonderful, amazing new things that are happening every single year. So if you get bored as a gardener, you're not paying attention. There's so much cool stuff happening.

Eric notices a wonderful plant that he’s actually not that familiar with. It has dynamic foliage that helps extend the season. And these look almost artificial. They're so interesting. These are WAXWINGS. And Natalie has three wonderful selections. Talk to us about this plant a little bit. This plant is called a coprosma or a mirror bush. You probably wouldn't be familiar with it unless you live in a really warm climate. They are hardy to zone nine. So if you live in south Florida, or if you live deep into Texas, these are great plants for those really warm regions. And they have beautiful, shiny, colorful leaves. Natalie shows the Waxwing series of coprosma. Waxwing Orange, Lime, Waxwing Gold. They’re bred just for their foliage, just for this really great, beautiful, colorful foliage. If you can get your hands on one of these in a colder climate, put a shrub in a container and plant other things around it. Use it as you would an annual.

Eric loves CREPE MYRTLE and it's another example of a plant that has really, really come a long way. Natalie agrees, things like the Center Stage series of crepe myrtle have that deep, dark purple, almost black foliage. Which when you have these bright flowers like on Center Stage pink or Center Stage coral juxtaposed against that black foliage, it really makes a striking statement in the garden.

Eric wants to talk about BLUEBERRY PLANTS. He loves when things we think of in terms, of more of an agricultural or a food crop, crossover into the ornamental space. Natalie agrees, this plant is Sky Dew Gold Blueberry, a vaccinium. It is a blueberry bush but was introduced for its foliage because it has gorgeous chartreuse foliage that starts to turn red in the fall.

Eric prompts Natalie, as we wrap up our conversation about all the amazing options that we have as gardeners to extend the season, we can't leave out the whole gymnosperms category, all the CONIFERS. Natalie has a couple of great examples. This chamaecyparis, is beautiful with its wispy blue foliage. Natalie believes that when a lot of people think evergreen, they think all evergreens are green. But you have something like Pinpoint Blue and Gold Chamaecyparis that has a blue tinge, meaning it has two colors to the foliage. And then it has that beautiful, tall pyramidal shape, tall and narrow, adding not only the color interest all season long, but adds a visual interest to a garden as well.

Eric finishes up - We could talk new plants literally all year long. He loves exploring new plants, it’s like finding a new color to paint with, it adds so much excitement to the garden. And this has been a wonderful array of really, really impressive plants. He got some great ideas that he's going to take home to his own garden. Natalie, thank you so much for sharing the day with us and sharing your knowledge with us. Natalie reciprocates, thanks for having me here. She was glad to be a part of GardenSMART.

LINKS:

Spring Meadow Nursery
Spring Meadow Nursery

Natalie Carmolli
All Your Hydrangea Questions Answered - Proven Winners ColorChoice

Containers
Collections | Michael Carr Designs

Plant List


   
 
FEATURED ARTICLE
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By Delilah Onofrey, Suntory Flowers
Photographs courtesy of Suntory Flowers

Planting annual beds of flowers, especially those that are bred to take the summer heat, thereby extending their glory into fall makes a lot of sense. Click here for an informative article that discusses an economical strategy along with design ideas that can provide color like - a living highlighter. To learn more click here.

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