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How To Video
Pond In A Pot

Design your own water feature



Water is one of the most fascinating features in any garden. If you live in a small space where a lake or water falls aren't possible consider a pond-in-a-pot.

A large container and a smaller container are needed. The smaller container will sit inside and a little above the larger container, thus they should both be similar material, in this case terracotta. The smaller container needs to be sealed, the hole at the bottom needs to be plugged so it will hold water. Silicone works well for this task, Dr. Rick uses aquarium sealer to plug the hole at the bottom of the smaller pot. Terracotta breathes, thus water will slowly seep from the smaller container through to the larger pot, providing the plants in the larger container a constant source of water. Once sealed, place the smaller container into the larger container, the smaller container should be positioned a little above the larger container. Adding a good potting mix to the larger container will help add height. A small recirculating pump is then used, it needs to be small so it can fit inside the smaller pot. This pump should have a way to increase or decrease the volume of water moving through. And it needs to have an on-off switch. Pumps like this typically cost $15-$20 and can be found at most home improvement stores. A third, small terracotta pot will be inverted and placed over the pump in the smaller pot. A piece of tubing attaches to the pump and goes up through the hole in the pot used to hide the pump. Dr. Rick took a file and made a small groove in the side of the smaller pot to place and hide the cord for the pump. On the top of the smaller pot place a dish or saucer. Drill a hole in the center, the plastic tubing will then go through this hole. Add two additional holes to allow water to recirculate down to the pump. Fill the smaller pot with water and make sure it's level. Turn on the pump, water will spout, place broken pot chards around the plastic tubing, to diffuse the water flow and adjust the water flow of the pump. Add plants to the larger container, in this case Dr. Rick used Zinnias, Vinca, Creeping Jenny and Labelia. Fill in all gaps in the soil with a good potting mix being careful not to get soil in the pump area or it could clog the pump. When complete you will have a small water feature that can go anywhere in you garden or on a deck.

From Fine Gardening
Make a Big Splash with a Tiny Water Garden


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