GardenSmart :: EPISODES :: 2015 show47
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Show #47/4208. Utilizing Space Effectively

Space and Scale
ERIC NOTICES NOT ONLY THE UTILIZATION OF SPACE BUT AS WELL THE SENSE OF SCALE in relation to the home. Bob has created little nooks and crannies, nice little intimate spaces throughout the property. Bob feels it's important in any design to stay true to the architecture of the house. In this case that drove the landscape design, he wanted a landscape that complimented the house. This is a modern architecture home, thus Bob played off that theme with neat, clean, straight lines.

Click here for more info

Plant Material
ERIC AND BOB NEXT LOOK AT THE PLANT MATERIAL. Although this is a fairly young planting the scale of plant material is impressive. Bob feels the one mistake most homeowners make is they blow their budget on hardscape material and don't hold back for plant material. This homeowner needed privacy, so he put money into large, mature screening trees. They add tremendously to the sense of scale and intimacy of the different spaces. There is a lushness to the area yet it's only a 2 year old planting. That additional texture is something that wouldn't be available with smaller plants.

Click here for more info

Five Creative Areas in One Space
THE USE OF SPACE IS ALSO EVIDENT IN THE DIFFERENT, CREATIVE AREAS. The backyard has a dramatic slope which if left "as is" would have resulted in very limited outdoor living space. But one steep area now has 5 exciting and unusual areas of interest, multiple outdoor living spaces.

Click here for more info

Stacked Stone Walls
ERIC ALSO LIKES THE WALLS THAT HAVE BEEN UTILIZED. One is a stacked stone wall that's artfully done. There is 8 to 10 feet of elevation change here. This is a space where some might have utilized an engineered wall or landscape timbers. Instead Bob put in the stacked stone wall that has a soft, natural feel. It's terraced, thus incorporates a lot of green space in between the walls which breaks up the area and compliments the overall design. It fits. This is a dry stacked stone wall. It has no footing, no block and no mortar. They used refurbished concrete from an old patio. They started the wall at about 4 feet wide at the base, kept the face straight and the back beveled up to about 18 inches at the top.

Click here for more info

2nd Home - Design Philosophy
ROBIN TELLS US ABOUT HER HOME, HER YARD AND HER DESIGN PHILOSOPHY. Since they moved here 10 years ago this yard has become her palate to experiment. The house was built in the 1950's and was a modern design for its time. When they bought this property it required many layers of stripping to renovate because over time things like dental molding, palladium windows and Georgian columns had been added. They wanted to reclaim the home and bring it back to it's original intention, 50's modern.

Click here for more info

Restoration
ERIC NOTICES THAT THE REOCCURRING THEME OF ROBIN'S HOME AND GARDENS IS ONE OF RESTORATION. There's a nurturing aspect to both home and gardens. They start with one special spot in Robin's garden, it is has been reclaimed and is now natural, yet livable. It is a wonderful sanctuary filled with lush vegetation and native plants. When Robin moved in this was virtually a forest, one couldn't see anything in this area. A Cherry tree fell, they came in to take it out and with the help of a machete, cleared the area. Once done they found an amphitheater-like setting created back in the 50's by the original owner.

Click here for more info

The Lake
ERIC AND ROBIN NEXT VISIT THE BACK OF THE HOUSE WHICH OVERLOOKS A BEAUTIFUL LAKE. This house was originally built as a lake house in the 50's and was constructed using many natural materials, such as brick, stone, glass and wood. They have tried to keep the integrity of those natural materials. Originally there was one, concrete path that led from the house to the lake. Robin has changed that, the path now provides a rambling feel and takes one by the different garden rooms on the way to the lake. Because, as Robin points out, it is not about the destination, it's about the journey. Eric likes the wonderful natural, soft lines that have been integrated throughout the garden. Everything works well; a lot of vegetation, nice little trails leading to different areas of the garden, especially the path to the lake.

Click here for more info

The Vineyard
ROBIN AND ERIC VISIT ANOTHER SPOT, ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF WHERE ROBIN HAS TAKEN THE ELEMENTS THE SITE GAVE HER AND CREATED SOMETHING SPECIAL. This is the vineyard and they're under an arbor. The vine is a 50 year old grape vine that, when they moved in 10 years ago, was laying on the ground. This area, in fact, was a wooded area with a fence. The previous owners had their dog run here. Robin came in, took down the fence, found the wonderful vine and decided to recreate a vineyard area by building an arbor and lifting up the vine. This is where she sat and composed the yard. This was the starting point. It is beautiful and a multi-purpose space that also affords a fantastic view of the lake.

Click here for more info

Vegetable Garden
IT'S HARD TO BEAT THE TASTE OF FRESH VEGETABLES, particularly fresh vegetables right at one's fingertips. Robin has created a beautiful, stylish vegetable garden, yet one that is totally functional. The plants look great.

Click here for more info

Creating a Focal Point
THIS GARDEN IS WHAT ROBIN VIEWS FROM THE INTERIOR OF THEIR HOME YEAR ROUND. Because of that she wanted to create a focal point, a center of interest. She did this by utilizing a bright colorful bench as well as native and shade plants. Magnolia grandiflora, Iteavirginica, and Hosta x hybrid are just a few in this area. They all make this a truly special area, one that stands out, particularly when on the inside looking out.

Click here for more info

The Water Garden
ERIC THINKS ROBIN HAS SAVED THE BEST FOR LAST, THE WATER GARDEN. This is an example of a fairly difficult spot, a space with a lot of hardscape, yet she has turned it into a paradise. This space is approximately 20 by 10 feet and reminds one of the patio areas often seen in townhouses, condominiums or apartments. And, these can be tricky to figure out what kind of creative ideas can be utilized to create a sanctuary. Robin has done a great job. This was originally a patio leading to a carport, which has now been enclosed.

Click here for more info

LINKS:

WPBA - Atlanta

Complete transcript of the show.

Show#47/4208. Utilizing Space Effectively

In this show we visit 2 very different gardens. One is small, the other large but both utilize space wonderfully and both provide some great design tips.

Eric first meets Bob Lytle a landscape architect that has designed the yard of the home with the smaller space. Bob has utilized the space beautifully and has incorporated a lot of personality into the design. Bob was understandably most influenced by members of his family. His father who was good with his hands, gave him an appreciation of building things. His uncle was involved with the landscape industry and Bob worked with him during summers where he developed an appreciation for the outdoors. Bob always had an ambition to be an architect but when introduced to landscape architecture he thought it provided an opportunity to be creative and produce more immediate results.

ERIC NOTICES NOT ONLY THE UTILIZATION OF SPACE BUT AS WELL THE SENSE OF SCALE in relation to the home. Bob has created little nooks and crannies, nice little intimate spaces throughout the property. Bob feels it's important in any design to stay true to the architecture of the house. In this case that drove the landscape design, he wanted a landscape that complimented the house. This is a modern architecture home, thus Bob played off that theme with neat, clean, straight lines. Additionally, he integrated a softer, somewhat Japanese theme to the garden and transitioned beautifully between the two. Eric first notices the hardscapes. Large boulders have been used throughout. Bob feels they've used them differently than most. The boulders sort of metamorphosize into the walls and the steps. Instead of using a column they would use a boulder, for example. They integrated boulders into everything. Because this is a smaller space the big boulders give a sense of massiveness. It's a beautiful, natural effect. In the patio Bob utilized smooth river stones and turned them on their edge to provide a beautiful texture. It's quite unique. And the retaining walls made of stone level out the different spaces and provide a very natural feel.
Top


ERIC AND BOB NEXT LOOK AT THE PLANT MATERIAL. Although this is a fairly young planting the scale of plant material is impressive. Bob feels the one mistake most homeowners make is they blow their budget on hardscape material and don't hold back for plant material. This homeowner needed privacy, so he put money into large, mature screening trees. They add tremendously to the sense of scale and intimacy of the different spaces. There is a lushness to the area yet it's only a 2 year old planting. That additional texture is something that wouldn't be available with smaller plants.
Top


THE USE OF SPACE IS ALSO EVIDENT IN THE DIFFERENT, CREATIVE AREAS. The backyard has a dramatic slope which if left "as is" would have resulted in very limited outdoor living space. But one steep area now has 5 exciting and unusual areas of interest, multiple outdoor living spaces. Starting at the top there is a coy pond that incorporates the signature boulders. The flowing water provides a soothing sound that can be heard throughout the garden. In front of the coy pond is a sheltered seating area that provides privacy and captures the sound of water. Above the seating area is a green roof. The green roof cools the area and importantly provides a focal point, drawing the eye upward. The roof garden and surroundings really add to the Japanese feel. Walking a few steps down from the coy pond one arrives at a wonderful patio area. It utilizes several different types of hardscape material as well as benches which could accommodate larger groups of people. It is surrounded with plant material making for a very relaxing space. It is stunning and inviting. In the corner one notices a wall and steps. Following the steps down unveils a great looking door and behind the door is a wine cellar. The dark wood and wine make a great garden destination. Not only is the wine cellar beautiful, but because it's subterranean it's cool and comfortable. A great location for a wine cellar. Going back up the stairs one notices some neat, offset stairs that lead even further down the hill and into a woodland. The steps are placed in an irregular pattern and look very natural. They almost seem to be saying 'follow me, see what's here." It all fits in beautifully. One needs to recount, yes there are 5 levels in all. It's unbelievable. A beautiful use of space. Bob tells Eric how it was done. It was certainly a challenging site. For the upper terrace, where the the coy pond is located they would have needed to build a retaining wall to get a level space. Instead of putting money into backfilling and installing a retaining wall, because the homeowner was interested in a wine cellar, they were able to incorporate that into the same square footage, which minimized the need for backfilling. The other areas fit beautifully once the pond and wine cellar were constructed. This a great use of space with a small backyard, interesting and very functional.
Top


ERIC ALSO LIKES THE WALLS THAT HAVE BEEN UTILIZED. One is a stacked stone wall that's artfully done. There is 8 to 10 feet of elevation change here. This is a space where some might have utilized an engineered wall or landscape timbers. Instead Bob put in the stacked stone wall that has a soft, natural feel. It's terraced, thus incorporates a lot of green space in between the walls which breaks up the area and compliments the overall design. It fits. This is a dry stacked stone wall. It has no footing, no block and no mortar. They used refurbished concrete from an old patio. They started the wall at about 4 feet wide at the base, kept the face straight and the back beveled up to about 18 inches at the top. That is what gives the wall it's strength, the dirt compacts against the angle. There is no hydraulic pressure, water runs right through and in Bob's opinion this wall will be here in a couple hundred years, much longer than with a manmade wall. The drainage is incredible and the wall has broken up what would otherwise be a long, tall hardscape.

Eric thanks Bob for the tour. This has been a wonderful learning experience. It's been very interesting to see how an expert has made use of a smaller space and made it look quite large.

Eric next visits with Robin. Robin is a master gardener and an artist. Her yard is fairly large, yet she has created small intimate rooms throughout the property to create a series of intimate spaces. It all works together beautifully and artfully.
Top


ROBIN TELLS US ABOUT HER HOME, HER YARD AND HER DESIGN PHILOSOPHY. Since they moved here 10 years ago this yard has become her palate to experiment. The house was built in the 1950's and was a modern design for its time. When they bought this property it required many layers of stripping to renovate because over time things like dental molding, palladium windows and Georgian columns had been added. They wanted to reclaim the home and bring it back to it's original intention, 50's modern. She did that, added an eyebrow over the front door, which she felt the original architect would have approved of, and brought the design into the 21st century. It's all simple, elegant and interesting. Robin has utilized similar design techniques throughout her gardens as well.
Top


ERIC NOTICES THAT THE REOCCURRING THEME OF ROBIN'S HOME AND GARDENS IS ONE OF RESTORATION. There's a nurturing aspect to both home and gardens. They start with one special spot in Robin's garden, it is has been reclaimed and is now natural, yet livable. It is a wonderful sanctuary filled with lush vegetation and native plants. When Robin moved in this was virtually a forest, one couldn't see anything in this area. A Cherry tree fell, they came in to take it out and with the help of a machete, cleared the area. Once done they found an amphitheater-like setting created back in the 50's by the original owner. There was cast iron irrigation throughout and wonderful vegetation. Things like spotted Acova, natural Azaleas, Hydrangea quercifolia Oakleaf and wonderful ferns along the creek bed were everywhere. Robin has taken a conservatory approach throughout the property. For example, the chairs came from the Cherry tree that fell, the paths on the property were created with mulch that came from other trees that were cleared. They have tried to use and recycle as much as possible.
Top


ERIC AND ROBIN NEXT VISIT THE BACK OF THE HOUSE WHICH OVERLOOKS A BEAUTIFUL LAKE. This house was originally built as a lake house in the 50's and was constructed using many natural materials, such as brick, stone, glass and wood. They have tried to keep the integrity of those natural materials. Originally there was one, concrete path that led from the house to the lake. Robin has changed that, the path now provides a rambling feel and takes one by the different garden rooms on the way to the lake. Because, as Robin points out, it is not about the destination, it's about the journey. Eric likes the wonderful natural, soft lines that have been integrated throughout the garden. Everything works well; a lot of vegetation, nice little trails leading to different areas of the garden, especially the path to the lake. On the way they pass a little room. It is the fish bench area which has a beautiful Salisburia adiantifolia 'Ginko biloba' tree. Robin reminds Eric that the Ginko tree was one of the 7 trees in the Garden of Eden. Robin has another tree that was in the Garden of Eden, the Ficus 'Fig' tree, in the front yard. Eric likes the way the pathway winds down the hill, then pops out between 2 dense evergreen hedges. By doing this Robin has created another nice garden room. And it is right on the lake. This is one of the favorite areas of their house. It overlooks a beautiful 5 acre lake. The lake was created in the 50's when they built the road systems in the area. It was created by damming up 3 streams. The lake is about 60 feet at its deepest and is filled with lots of fish-bass, crappy and catfish. At the far end is a bird estuary where Heron and Owls and Geese and Ducks live. Once again they've recycled; the Georgian columns that once adorned the front are now located on the dock. By the lake are some neat Iris sibirica 'Japanese Iris', they were taken from another location on the property, the water garden. Robin divided them, brought them down here and they're obviously happy because they've multiplied prolifically.
Top


ROBIN AND ERIC VISIT ANOTHER SPOT, ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF WHERE ROBIN HAS TAKEN THE ELEMENTS THE SITE GAVE HER AND CREATED SOMETHING SPECIAL. This is the vineyard and they're under an arbor. The vine is a 50 year old grape vine that, when they moved in 10 years ago, was laying on the ground. This area, in fact, was a wooded area with a fence. The previous owners had their dog run here. Robin came in, took down the fence, found the wonderful vine and decided to recreate a vineyard area by building an arbor and lifting up the vine. This is where she sat and composed the yard. This was the starting point. It is beautiful and a multi-purpose space that also affords a fantastic view of the lake.
Top


IT'S HARD TO BEAT THE TASTE OF FRESH VEGETABLES, particularly fresh vegetables right at one's fingertips. Robin has created a beautiful, stylish vegetable garden, yet one that is totally functional. The plants look great. Robin's husband is a gourmet cook, thus they've planned the garden together. He cooks them, Robin grows them. Here one sees many varieties of tomatoes. This year they're using a new staking system using bamboo from the yard and heavy string to hold the tomatoes up. The plants are irrigated from the lake, thus water isn't a concern. Eric notices about every herb under the sun and they are all doing well. Robin shows us a few. Remember these are for the kitchen, yet some are used as a border for the herb garden. She has Ocimum basiliscum (Basil), Coriandrum sativum (Cilantro), Origanum syriacum (Oregano), Salvia officinalis (Sage) as well as Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) which is used as a frame for the garden. It is great in the kitchen as well as providing a great scent when walking by. Thus these plants provide utilitarian uses for the kitchen but also serve structural or functional purposes in the garden.
Top


Regardless of how much space one has available there are always wonderful, creative ways of creating intimate spaces in the garden. Today we've seen some great examples of small gardens that have utilized little nooks and crannies and niches in the garden; as well we've seen a big garden that has utilized small spaces to basically, break up the big area and make it feel nice and intimate. In many respects a garden is an extension of the home. Eric and Robin visit just such a space. THIS GARDEN IS WHAT ROBIN VIEWS FROM THE INTERIOR OF THEIR HOME YEAR ROUND. Because of that she wanted to create a focal point, a center of interest. She did this by utilizing a bright colorful bench as well as native and shade plants. Magnolia grandiflora, Iteavirginica, and Hosta x hybrid are just a few in this area. They all make this a truly special area, one that stands out, particularly when on the inside looking out.
Top


ERIC THINKS ROBIN HAS SAVED THE BEST FOR LAST, THE WATER GARDEN. This is an example of a fairly difficult spot, a space with a lot of hardscape, yet she has turned it into a paradise. This space is approximately 20 by 10 feet and reminds one of the patio areas often seen in townhouses, condominiums or apartments. And, these can be tricky to figure out what kind of creative ideas can be utilized to create a sanctuary. Robin has done a great job. This was originally a patio leading to a carport, which has now been enclosed. Thus this area originally was a blank canvas with only a beautiful Camellia japonica tree and a beautiful Acer palmatum (Japanese Maple). Robin then added the water garden because she likes to engage the senses when designing her gardens, thus the sound of water. She added the Trachelospermum jasminoides (Carolina Star Jasmine) because of its scent and added a lot of ferns growing along the bank for their texture. As well, she added some glass balls, water sculpture, that her son, a professional artist, made for Robin's garden. She once again has blended art with the design of the garden. Eric likes the lush feel, in particular, he likes the Colocasia esculenta 'Red Stem,' Iris virginica shrevei 'blue flag' and pitcher plants. Eric thanks Robin. Her gardening skills and artistic talents really make this yard and garden stand out. We appreciate the tour.

We've been fortunate in this show to view 2 different gardens. One utilized a small space and incorporated garden rooms throughout utilizing space very effectively. The second was a larger space but still utilized smaller garden rooms throughout to provide a sense of intimacy. Both provide lessons we can all utilize in our yards and gardens.
Top

LINKS:

WPBA - Atlanta


   
 
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